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// Peter Ehrlich

Want to build a compelling 3D interactive experience that anyone can instantly access through their browser? You’ve come to the right place! We just released a new VR demo that makes it really easy to start building right away. Built with Mozilla’s WebVR API, VR Quickstart features position and orientation tracking, Leap Motion interaction, and code that’s been broken down to bite-sized pieces.

Visual feedback is hugely important when it comes to motion control – since users can feel lost or frustrated when they’re not sure how their actions are affecting an application. Virtual hands can make it much easier for users to identify what’s happening onscreen. Thanks to the new v2 tracking, we’ve been able to create persistent rigged hands for LeapJS that reflect how your hands look and behave in the real world.

Want to demo your website, or perform multiple tests with the same gesture? With our web-based Playback tool, you can record, crop, play, and save snippets of your own Leap Motion usage in JavaScript.

In this post, the second of my three-part series on LeapJS plugins, we’ll take a look at Proximity Alert, an audio feedback plugin which gives beeps based upon your hand position. It can be used in any app, and is fully open-source.

There is a saying among web developers that goes something like this: “If you’re trying to do a thing, there’s a jQuery plugin that will do it.” Sometimes, it’s two. Or three. Although they can’t do everything, there’s no doubt that their module system has saved me hundreds of hours – and hundreds of thousands or more across the web collectively. Drawing from this, we’re excited to release a badass plugin system for LeapJS.