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// Art & Design

Take an infrared selfie and post it @LeapMotion #3DJam. Create your dream house in VR. Weave light and sound with your bare hands. Or just paint some happy little trees! In today’s 3D Jam spotlight, we’re featuring 17 brand-new art and music experiences and utilities that will ignite your creative spark. They’re all free for download at itch.io/jam/leapmotion3djam.

With the 3D Jam just around the corner, we thought we’d give you a headstart – with a full guide to the very latest resources to bring your to life. In this post, we’ll cover everything you need to know about our integrations and best practices for augmented and virtual reality, desktop, and the Internet of Things. A […]

What makes a collection of pixels into a magic experience? The art of storytelling. At the latest VRLA Summer Expo, creative coder Isaac Cohen (aka Cabbibo) shared his love for the human possibilities of virtual reality, digital experiences, and the power of hugs. Isaac opens the talk by thinking about how we create the representation […]

Music videos have evolved significantly since TRL. Last week, we were thrilled to come across a new release from Darwin Deez called Kill Your Attitude, where the perils of modern love take some truly bizarre emotional and technical twists. Love (literally) becomes a battlefield when Darwin’s angry girlfriend becomes the player in a first-person shooter, taking the central conflict to some vividly imaginative heights as she hunts him down for great justice.

Want to transform literally any physical surface into a fully interactive button? Touch Everything is an open source C++ demo from Russian design agency The Family that shows how you can rapidly create touchscreens from just about anything, from beer cans to paper. The demo and full source code is available on our Developer Gallery.

Among developers, interactive designers, and digital artists, Processing is an enormously popular way to build compelling experiences with minimal coding. We’ve seen hundreds of Leap Motion experiments using Processing, from Arduino hacks to outdoor art installations, and the list grows every week.

James Britt, aka Neurogami, is the developer behind the LeapMotionP5 library, which brings together our Java API with the creative power of Processing. He’s just rolled out a major update to the library, including a new boilerplate demo and a demo designed to bridge hand input with musical output. We caught up with James to ask about the library, his latest examples, and how you can get started.

As our physical reality becomes increasingly augmented, creative coders are able to access a whole new trove of intriguing possibilities. Several weeks back, we stumbled upon one such experiment called TACTUM, an unusual combination of projection mapping, motion controls, depth sensing, and 3D printing to create customized wearables. With all that technology, the design process is surprisingly simple – all you need is the light on your skin.

The global epidemic of boring presentations stops here. With Reveal.js, you have access to a powerful presentation platform that runs in your browser, giving you the ability to hack and connect it to almost anything. Want to point and navigate with Leap Motion instead of hunching over your laptop? You can do that. Let your audience cast votes on their cell phones? Absolutely.

Reveal.js is the brainchild of Hakim El-Attab, a Swedish engineer and co-founder of Slides. “Being able to add any HTML content inside of a presentation means you can have content that updates in real time, embed iframes like Tweets and YouTube videos and much more,” he says. “The framework is also easily hackable so that it can be tweaked to anyone’s personal preference.”

When virtual reality and musical interface design collide, entire universes can be musical instruments. Created by artists Rob Hamilton and Chris Platz for the Stanford Laptop Orchestra, Carillon is a networked VR instrument that brings you inside a massive virtual bell tower. By reaching into the inner workings and playing with the gears, you can create hauntingly beautiful, complex music.

The frustrating thing about raw Twitter data is that it tends to remove the very element that makes the platform so interesting in the first place: the nuance of human sentiment. But what if you could harness the power of that data back with your own two hands, set to music?