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There are no limits to what you can hack together with the Leap Motion Controller – which is why this year’s Leap Motion 3D Jam includes an Open Track for desktop and Internet of Things projects! In this post, hardware hacker Syed Anwaarullah walks through his 3D-printed robotic hand project, which appeared at India’s first-ever Maker Faire. The […]

When the Leap Motion Controller made its rounds at our office a couple of years ago, it’s safe to say we were blown away. For me at least, it was something from the future. I was able to physically interact with my computer, moving an object on the screen with the motion of my hands. And that was amazing.

Fast-forward two years, and we’ve found that PubNub has a place in the Internet of Things… a big place. To put it simply, PubNub streams data bidirectionally to control and monitor connected IoT devices. PubNub is a glue that holds any number of connected devices together – making it easy to rapidly build and scale real-time IoT, mobile, and web apps by providing the data stream infrastructure, connections, and key building blocks that developers need for real-time interactivity.

With that in mind, two of our evangelists had the idea to combine the power of Leap Motion with the brains of a Raspberry Pi to create motion-controlled servos. In a nutshell, the application enables a user to control servos using motions from their hands and fingers. Whatever motion their hand makes, the servo mirrors it. And even cooler, because we used PubNub to connect the Leap Motion to the Raspberry Pi, we can control our servos from anywhere on Earth.

As our physical reality becomes increasingly augmented, creative coders are able to access a whole new trove of intriguing possibilities. Several weeks back, we stumbled upon one such experiment called TACTUM, an unusual combination of projection mapping, motion controls, depth sensing, and 3D printing to create customized wearables. With all that technology, the design process is surprisingly simple – all you need is the light on your skin.

What if buildings could change their shape in response to your movements? This week on Developer Labs, dive into the future of architecture with the creators of the Aether Project. Plus, highlights from last month’s Leap Motion hackathon and a new Japanese language feature in the Airspace Store. Also new this week, learning the periodic […]

PennApps is a meeting place for dedicated hackers ready to camp out for 48 hours straight of experimentation, coding, and a lot of energy drinks. We saw an impressive array of Leap Motion hacks built throughout the weekend, and when it came down to choosing the winner of the Leap Motion API prize, it was almost impossible to decide.

What does music look like? What happens when you reach into a fractal? Explore these questions on Developer Labs with Isaac Cohen, and stay tuned for his livestreamed SFHTML5 talk on Thursday. Plus, a great guide to waving through colors with a Philips Hue bulb. Also this week, we have a real-time projection mapping robot, […]

What do a Philips Hue bulb and the Leap Motion Controller have to do with each other? Nothing, until you start imagining how they can work together. Today, we’ll take a look at how I can control colors by waving my hand in the air.

Happy New Year! Today on Developer Labs, raise a glass to 2013 as we cover some of our favorite stories and projects from the past year. Plus, playing GTA V with hand movements, an experimental approach to animation, 3D browsing, and a catapult made from Lego® bricks. To subscribe to our developer newsletter and get […]

Wouldn’t it be lot cool if we could use our laptop’s inbuilt Bluetooth module to send Leap Motion data wirelessly to a Bluetooth-enabled Arduino and have some fun? Here’s how you can do it too!