We’ve come a long way since we first launched the Leap Motion Controller two years ago. Today, we’re marking the occasion by announcing our second annual 3D Jam! For six weeks, starting on Sept. 28th, developers around the world will build innovative experiences for virtual reality, desktop, mobile, and beyond.

Since we released our technology to the world, we’ve been constantly working to bring new tools and assets to developers building with the Leap Motion platform. Resources like video passthrough, Image Hands, and UI Widgets are all small but fundamental steps in building the future of VR. We can’t wait to see what kinds of experiences you can build with them.

Last year’s competition was incredible, with over 150 submissions and some really amazing titles. For 3D Jam 2015, teams will compete in two tracks – Open and AR/VR. We’re giving away over $50,000 in prizes. Entries will be accepted until November 9th, 2015 at 11:59:59 pm PST. (Full contest rules here.)

Read More »

Early last month, Leap Motion kicked off our internal hackathon with a round of pitch sessions. This basically involves everyone bouncing crazy ideas off each other to see which ones would stick. One of our tracking engineers suggested using our prototype Dragonfly module to augment a physical display with virtual widgets. Our team of five ran with this concept to create AR Screen.

You’ve probably heard the rest of the story. Our team’s video got shared on /r/oculus and led to a feature on Wired. While the Wired story focuses a lot on the experience side of things – the power of spatial thinking and offices of the future – it was light on the technical details. Since we’ve heard from a lot of VR developers interested in the project, I thought I’d do a deep dive here on the blog.

Disclaimer: Lots of ugly hackathon code ahead!

Read More »

leap-of-thrones

Hackathons are a great way to jumpstart creativity, especially when honor and glory are on the line. Recently, Leap Motion kicked off one of our internal hackathons, where small teams pitch and develop quick demos over the course of two days. After one of our engineers posted a video of AR Screen – a project using the Dragonfly module prototype to create an augmented reality work environment – the video soon went viral and was later featured on Wired.

While none of the demos produced during the hackathon were intended to be polished products, we’re excited to see what these small teams were able to build over just 48 hours. Today, we thought we’d take a closer look at some other projects from the hackathon. Next week, we’ll have more to share about the AR Screen project.

Read More »

One of the most powerful things about the Leap Motion platform is its ability to tie into just about any creative platform. That’s why we’ve launched a Platform Integrations & Libraries showcase where you can discover the latest wrappers, plugins, and integrations.

Whether you started programming at four years old, or yesterday afternoon, there’s nothing like that first time when something you coded springs to life and says “Hello World!” Scratch is a simple programming language that aims to bring that experience to more people than ever, with simple building blocks that make programming fun and accessible for beginners of all ages.

Wscratch-logoith the new Leap Motion ScratchX extension, students can bring hand data into ScratchX – an experimental space that lets you try extensions in the Scratch programming environment. ScratchX extensions make it easy to program physical devices like Arduino boards, or build simple web apps. On our Developer Gallery, you can find the extension along with two new examples: a simple hand skeleton and a prize wheel game. Yesterday, we caught up with Kreg Henning, the extension’s creator.

Read More »

Have you ever received an MRI scan back from the lab and thought to yourself, “I’m not sure how even a medical professional could derive any insightful information from this blast of murky images?” You’re not alone. But what if, instead of having your doctor’s obtuse interpretation suffice, you could physically walk through your ailment with your doctor in VR, parsing and pointing out the nuances of pain felt within pieces of inflamed tendons or nerves or sections of your brain?

Brain Connectivity, a new example in the Developer Gallery, marks the beginning of a Master’s Thesis project from Biomedical Engineering student Filipe Rodrigues. The experiment uses slices of

Read More »

Boom! The white globe in front of you explodes into an array of color and light. A fraction of a second later – whoosh! – glowing stars streak past your head, leaving you in their colorful wake.

Reaching toward the holographic interface, with the motion of a single finger, you take control of time itself. The firework slows. Stops. Then it begins to recede back to the center. You slow time again as the stars ease past you, watching as the firework surrounds you. Entropy turns on its head again, and the firework calmly implodes into a single white globe.

But how would this firework look in orange and yellow? Exploding in a spiral pattern? You casually switch between holographic menu panels to make some changes. You’re about to find out with Firework Factory VR.

Read More »

Music videos have evolved significantly since TRL. Last week, we were thrilled to come across a new release from Darwin Deez called Kill Your Attitude, where the perils of modern love take some truly bizarre emotional and technical twists. Love (literally) becomes a battlefield when Darwin’s angry girlfriend becomes the player in a first-person shooter, taking the central conflict to some vividly imaginative heights as she hunts him down for great justice.

Read More »

Want to transform literally any physical surface into a fully interactive button? Touch Everything is an open source C++ demo from Russian design agency The Family that shows how you can rapidly create touchscreens from just about anything, from beer cans to paper. The demo and full source code is available on our Developer Gallery.

Read More »

processing

One of the most powerful things about the Leap Motion platform is its ability to tie into just about any creative platform. That’s why we’ve launched a Platform Integrations & Libraries showcase where you can discover the latest wrappers, plugins, and integrations.

Among developers, interactive designers, and digital artists, Processing is an enormously popular way to build compelling experiences with minimal coding. We’ve seen hundreds of Leap Motion experiments using Processing, from Arduino hacks to outdoor art installations, and the list grows every week.

“Many people are interested in what programming can do, but get really frustrated when they start getting into things like tedious details of many languages. Processing abstracts a lot of that stuff away, so designers and artists can just focus on building.”

James Britt, aka Neurogami, is the developer behind the LeapMotionP5 library, which brings together our Java API with the creative power of Processing.

He’s just rolled out a major update to the library, including a new boilerplate example and a demo designed to bridge hand input with musical output. We caught up with James to ask about the library, his latest examples, and how you can get started.

Read More »

ipd-comparison

To scale or not to scale? When it comes to augmented reality, the right camera alignment and scale are absolutely essential to bridging the gap between real and virtual worlds. And as developers are already experimenting with image passthrough and hybrid reality resources like Image Hands, this is more important than ever.

Based on our ongoing research and testing, we’ve updated our VR Best Practices to recommend one-to-one alignment between the real-world and virtual cameras, and created a demo to let you experience the difference. Here’s why.

Read More »