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// Medical

Itadakimasu (Japanese for ‘Bon Appetit’) is a therapeutic VR experience that allows users to interact with animals through different hand gestures. The focus of this piece stems from research findings that animal-assisted therapy can help decrease anxiety and reduce blood pressure in patients. Although the experience is simple in content, my intent is that it […]

For hundreds of years, dead bodies (cadavers) have taught medical students about human anatomy. In cadaver labs, students dissect, touch, rotate, and explore organs in hands-on experiences that make knowledge stick for a lifetime. Unfortunately, these experiences are out of reach for most of us. Cadaver labs are expensive to run and cadavers are in […]

In September, I won a Leap Motion Controller at a hackathon and started thinking about what I could build with it. After playing around with the SDK a little bit to understand what kind of data I could get, I thought it would be cool to build a translator for sign language.

The votes are in! Based on community ratings and scores from the Leap Motion team, we’re excited to present the winners of the second annual 3D Jam. This year’s 3D Jam raised the bar with over $75,000 in cash and prizes, and we’re impressed with the imagination and creativity of everyone who participated. With nearly […]

Are these the droids you’re looking for? Check out educational 3D Jam demos that take you to the center of the earth, or into the human body. Plus, 7 IoT experiments that bring us just a little closer to the future, including an experimental wheelchair.

In the tech world, “making the world a better place” has become a bit of a cliché. But with over a billion people living with some form of disability or impairment, medical technology can make a huge difference in people’s everyday lives. That’s why Virtualware is using Leap Motion technology to help people recovering from […]

Vivid Vision thinks so, and they want it to help millions of people. Formerly known as Diplopia, they believe that VR can help treat common vision problems like lazy eye and cross-eye, which happen when the brain ignores input from the weaker eye. Their solution – a VR experience that combines medical research with gameplay mechanics – is now rolling out to eye clinics around the USA.

From the operating room to virtual reality, here are 5 ways that people are using Leap Motion tech for medical and assistive applications.

One of the most exciting things about VR is its power to play tricks on the mind. From creating new senses to improving old ones, here are four ways that VR developers are experimenting with human perception.

From drinking your morning coffee to turning off the lamp, you use your hands thousands of times a day. It’s easy to take for granted – until your hands don’t cooperate. To help people rehabilitate from strokes and hand tremors, doctors and researchers are doing some really amazing things with off-the-shelf hardware.

In a recent presentation for the Society for Neuroscience Conference, three researchers from UCSF stacked the Leap Motion Controller against two different data gloves to help assess people who suffered from stroke. They believe that the Leap Motion Controller could play a key role in how doctors diagnose and treat a variety of brain disorders – even during live surgery.