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// sculpting

Last time, we looked at how an interactive VR sculpture could be created with the Leap Motion Graphic Renderer as part of an experiment in interaction design. With the sculpture’s shapes rendering, we can now craft and code the layout and control of this 3D shape pool and the reactive behaviors of the individual objects.

By adding the Interaction Engine to our scene and InteractionBehavior components to each object, we have the basis for grasping, touching and other interactions. But for our VR sculpture, we can also use the Interaction Engine’s robust and performant awareness of hand proximity. With this foundation, we can experiment quickly with different reactions to hand presence, pinching, and touching specific objects. Let’s dive in!

How would you sculpt a virtual piece of clay? It’s a deceptively simple question – one that we’ve been thinking about for years. Despite the enormous power of modern CAD applications, it still takes hours on the computer to design something that can be sculpted in five minutes using clay. That’s why we created Sculpting, our clay sculpting app, over the course of two months. Here’s how we did it.

How we think about everyday objects is changing with accessible 3D printing, and new tools are emerging to make it easier to design and create just about anything you can imagine. Sculpteo and the Autodesk Gallery recently hosted a “Decoding 3D Printing” workshop to help hobbyists and professionals get up to speed in an afternoon. […]

For touch-based input technologies, triggering an action is a simple binary question. Touch the device to engage with it. Release it to disengage. Motion control offers a lot more nuance and power, but unlike with mouse clicks or screen taps, your hand doesn’t have the ability to disappear at will. Instead of designing interactions in black and white, we need to start thinking in shades of gray.

Last week, we showed you how easy it is to create a sculpture in the air with Sculpting and get it delivered straight to your mailbox. But what if you could cut out the wait? What if you could walk into a shop with an idea, and come out with an object in your hands?

As a wise philosopher once said, we are living in a material world. While virtual objects are great, there’s something amazing about being able to hold something in your hand – like how an image on your computer can disappear in a flash, but a physical photograph is unique and permanent. Today, we’re going to show you how to bring your Sculpting creations to life with the power of 3D printing, from bits to atoms in five easy steps.

Over the years, traditional menu design practices have developed along the lines made possible by hardware. Unfortunately, as a result, many of these practices don’t apply to apps built for natural user interfaces (NUIs) like the Leap Motion Controller – so that creating great menus is an ongoing challenge for Leap Motion developers. Recently, by experimenting with some alternative approaches, we’ve managed to push past these growing pains and overcome some of these hurdles in menu design.

Happy Thanksgiving! In the spirit of the holiday, we’ve created a turkey model for you to sculpt and enjoy with our new 3D modelling app, Sculpting.

This week in Airspace, sculpt clay in the air, dive through Stan Lee’s latest creation, and soar above the clouds to explore global weather with our latest apps for Mac and Windows. Plus, a free app from Flow Studios, a new educational app from PBS and Sid the Science Kid, and lots more.