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// Medical

The “Augmented Hand Series” (by Golan Levin, Chris Sugrue, and Kyle McDonald) is a real-time interactive software system that presents playful, dreamlike, and uncanny transformations of its visitors’ hands. It consists of a box into which the visitor inserts their hand, and a screen which displays their ‘reimagined’ hand—for example, with an extra finger, or with fingers that move autonomously. Critically, the project’s transformations operate within the logical space of the hand itself, which is to say: the artwork performs “hand-aware” visualizations that alter the deep structure of how the hand appears.

We learned so much on the ground with our developer community in 2014. Translating soothing gestures into meditative brainwaves on EEGs. Springing drones to life. Navigating new ways of thinking about user interfaces in VR.

You’ve built incredible things this year, and along the way, we’ve based many of the experiments, resources, and examples found in the Developer Portal on your feedback and feature requests. We can’t wait to keep that conversation going in the New Year. And now, for a bit of inspiration, behold – our 2014 Shortlist of Virtual Superlatives:

Hand tremors from diseases such as essential tremor, Parkinson’s disease, Wilson’s disease, dystonia and others affect tens of millions of people around the world, and the neurological and genetic basis for many tremors is still yet to be understood. Patients suffer physically, often unable to write and practice art, as well as socially, with tremors giving rise to more social anxiety.

Unfortunately, there are relatively few ways for individuals and doctors to quickly and reliably track tremor progression over time. With better tremor measurement and tracking using Leap Motion, I believe research could progress faster aiding in the treatment of tremors and doctors could have a more efficient tool for quantifying tremor.

Human anatomy is complex in its nature, and people have been trying to understand it since the late Bronze Age. My latest project, the Online Anatomical Human (OAH), is the first of its kind – offering real anatomical data in an online environment with existing linked knowledge and the ability to add and share new information. I describe this data as real anatomical data, because it’s obtained from medical imaging data and is not based on an idealized average anatomy.

In any 3D virtual environment, selecting objects with a mouse becomes difficult if the scene becomes densely populated and structures are occluded. This is a real problem with anatomy models, where there is no true empty space and organs, vessels, and nerves always sit flush with adjacent structures.

Using a mouse and keyboard in an operating room can mean several minutes of scrubbing to prevent cross-contamination. TedCas wants to change that, using Leap Motion technology in a plug-and-play, low-cost console.

Digital technologies in the operating room can be powerful tools for surgeons, but only as long as they can be controlled without compromising sterile procedures. In the last of our AXLR8R spotlight videos, DriftCoast co-founder Hua (Michael) Chen talks about how he was inspired to use Leap Motion technology to open up new interactive possibilities within the OR. Their […]

By creating a game that forced his eyes to work together, cross-eye sufferer and game developer James Blaha has been working to overcome his condition and retrain his brain with the power of gamification.

No surgeon likes to walk away from a patient on the operating table with a tube in their heart. While coronary catheterization can help people with a wide variety of heart problems, physicians are still forced to leave their patient’s side to control the catheter and avoid breaking sterile procedures. But that’s about to change. Thanks to DriftCoast, surgeons may soon be able to touchlessly control cardiac catheters within the operating theater.

After a stroke or physical injury, the road to recovery can be long and difficult. Physical therapy is a slow process that often takes months before positive effects can be felt. In the meantime, patients are stuck performing dull, repetitive tasks that feel like chores. But what if you could make physical rehabilitation into a game?