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// hackathon

Early last month, Leap Motion kicked off our internal hackathon with a round of pitch sessions. This basically involves everyone bouncing crazy ideas off each other to see which ones would stick. One of our tracking engineers suggested using our prototype Dragonfly module to augment a physical display with virtual widgets. Our team of five ran with this concept to create AR Screen.

You’ve probably heard the rest of the story. Our team’s video got shared on /r/oculus and led to a feature on Wired. While the Wired story focuses a lot on the experience side of things – the power of spatial thinking and offices of the future – it was light on the technical details. Since we’ve heard from a lot of VR developers interested in the project, I thought I’d do a deep dive here on the blog.

Hackathons are a great way to jumpstart creativity, especially when honor and glory are on the line. Recently, Leap Motion kicked off one of our internal hackathons, where small teams pitch and develop quick demos over the course of two days. After one of our engineers posted a video of AR Screen – a project using the Dragonfly module prototype to create an augmented reality work environment – the video soon went viral and was later featured on Wired.

While none of the demos produced during the hackathon were intended to be polished products, we’re excited to see what these small teams were able to build over just 48 hours. Today, we thought we’d take a closer look at some other projects from the hackathon. Next week, we’ll have more to share about the AR Screen project.

It’s no secret that for many developers in our community, midnight is the hour when the hacking gets good. Late last Friday night, over 1,000 undergraduates from across the country poured into California Memorial Stadium for Cal Hacks, a 36-hour coding spree put on by Major League Hacking. Sponsors ranging from tech’s biggest players to […]

There’s no denying the buzz around hackathons transforming computer science education, or technical education overall. Over the course of 24 hours (or a weekend) coders can join together in massive marathon sessions, playing with real-world code for fun and prizes. On the other hand, classes are often portrayed as the opposite extreme – slow, unexciting, overly focused on theory.

For a lot of kids, STEM subjects (science, technology, engineering, and math) can seem distant and inaccessible. This weekend, Nickelodeon and the city of Burbank kicked off Game+Hack – a three-day hackathon where students, teachers, and novices joined developers, designers, and NASA engineers to play with the latest gadgets and build creative mobile apps.

This weekend, 100 developers, designers, and makers gathered at Apportable HQ to wrestle with ways we can use devices to hack into our neural pathways. From anxiety and panic suppression, to speed reading, to chair flying flight simulators, to mood bracelets, we saw some incredible projects produced over the course of two days – several of which artfully integrated Leap Motion technology.

Nowadays, just about everything has an API, from lightbulbs to needy toasters. While we’ve seen our fair share of drone hacks using JavaScript, what happens when your drone is controlled by a closed-end analog signal?

In case you haven’t noticed, we’re big fans of hackathons at Leap Motion, and when it comes to the left coast, there’s no hackathon bigger than LA Hacks. Recently, we caught up with a couple of teams from last month’s epic code battle, including finalists Team Armateur. When Gagik Movsisyan and his team stepped into […]

Perhaps the most exciting thing about IoT is that everyday uses don’t always reveal themselves right away. Sometimes they need to be coaxed out. By experimenting at the edges of what’s possible with modern APIs, the hacker community gets to define those possible uses and parameters. At Hackendo, this past weekend’s wearables-and-externals IoT hackathon, I […]

When the first boots of a human being land on Mars, imagine being able to RSVP and attend the event from your living room and actually feel like you were there, right next to the astronauts. Equipped with versions of the augmented and virtual reality technologies currently under exploration at NASA, this is an incredibly […]