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// Guest Posts

Itadakimasu (Japanese for ‘Bon Appetit’) is a therapeutic VR experience that allows users to interact with animals through different hand gestures. The focus of this piece stems from research findings that animal-assisted therapy can help decrease anxiety and reduce blood pressure in patients. Although the experience is simple in content, my intent is that it […]

For hundreds of years, dead bodies (cadavers) have taught medical students about human anatomy. In cadaver labs, students dissect, touch, rotate, and explore organs in hands-on experiences that make knowledge stick for a lifetime. Unfortunately, these experiences are out of reach for most of us. Cadaver labs are expensive to run and cadavers are in […]

In September, I won a Leap Motion Controller at a hackathon and started thinking about what I could build with it. After playing around with the SDK a little bit to understand what kind of data I could get, I thought it would be cool to build a translator for sign language.

From the moment we’re birthed, we begin to move. We move by virtue of our legs, our bodies, the motion of our arms and hands, the intricate articulation of all of our fingers. Each of these movements correlates with synaptic connections in the brain and provides the rich landscape required for exponential neuronal growth. We […]

Star Wars: The Force Awakens is upon us. Everyone is having Star Wars fever, including me. What I wanted to do is to find the easiest way to control a lightsaber just like they do in the movies. I bought my son a lightsaber toy at Toys ‘R’ Us, and wanted to introduce him to the […]

When the Leap Motion Controller made its rounds at our office a couple of years ago, it’s safe to say we were blown away. For me at least, it was something from the future. I was able to physically interact with my computer, moving an object on the screen with the motion of my hands. And that was amazing.

Fast-forward two years, and we’ve found that PubNub has a place in the Internet of Things… a big place. To put it simply, PubNub streams data bidirectionally to control and monitor connected IoT devices. PubNub is a glue that holds any number of connected devices together – making it easy to rapidly build and scale real-time IoT, mobile, and web apps by providing the data stream infrastructure, connections, and key building blocks that developers need for real-time interactivity.

With that in mind, two of our evangelists had the idea to combine the power of Leap Motion with the brains of a Raspberry Pi to create motion-controlled servos. In a nutshell, the application enables a user to control servos using motions from their hands and fingers. Whatever motion their hand makes, the servo mirrors it. And even cooler, because we used PubNub to connect the Leap Motion to the Raspberry Pi, we can control our servos from anywhere on Earth.

Virtual reality and the Internet of Things are fundamentally different in many ways, but they share a common goal – bringing digital experiences into the 3D world. And whether that world is a space full of physical objects, or a parallel universe of our own creation, the best 3D interfaces are the ones that have the power to become part of the environment.

Following my tutorial on controlling the Sphero using the Leap Motion, I thought I would keep on converting my Node.js projects to Cylon.js and work on controlling an AR.Drone with Leap Motion.

In my personal time, I love to play around with hardware and robots. I started in Node.js but recently I discovered Cylon.js and after a quick play around with it, I found it pretty awesome and decided to rewrite my projects using this framework.

As a starting point, I decided to rewrite the project to control the Sphero with the Leap Motion Controller.

We at Thomas Street have been eyeing the Oculus Rift for quite some time, paying particular attention to demos featuring novel interfaces. We all grew tired of talking about how we wanted to explore VR development, so we allocated several weeks to tinkering with the Oculus Rift and Leap Motion— staffing one full-time developer and a […]