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// Three.js

What makes a collection of pixels into a magic experience? The art of storytelling. At the latest VRLA Summer Expo, creative coder Isaac Cohen (aka Cabbibo) shared his love for the human possibilities of virtual reality, digital experiences, and the power of hugs. Isaac opens the talk by thinking about how we create the representation […]

Who said Unity developers have all the fun? From building virtual hands in Three.js to browser-based virtual reality, we’re also developing new tools to enable truly 3D interaction on the web. This week, we’re happy to announce LeapJS Widgets – basic UI elements can be used in a wide variety of experiences. It’s a brand new library, simple enough to be used with just a few lines of code, but with near-infinite possibilities for experimentation and customization.

Mozilla WebVR + Leap Motion interaction

How pervasive will virtual reality be? VR has the power to fundamentally transform the way we learn, play, share and even browse the web. Mozilla’s recent experiments combining VR and the web pave a path towards virtual presence – pushing beyond disconnected feelings of immersion and bringing us into new places with a life of their own.

Visual feedback is hugely important when it comes to motion control – since users can feel lost or frustrated when they’re not sure how their actions are affecting an application. Virtual hands can make it much easier for users to identify what’s happening onscreen. Thanks to the new v2 tracking, we’ve been able to create persistent rigged hands for LeapJS that reflect how your hands look and behave in the real world.

As any interaction designer knows, there’s rarely only one right answer, but there are usually about a million wrong answers. That’s why we’ve been experimenting with a variety of interaction models, including camera controls for Three.js.

For a lot of kids, STEM subjects (science, technology, engineering, and math) can seem distant and inaccessible. This weekend, Nickelodeon and the city of Burbank kicked off Game+Hack – a three-day hackathon where students, teachers, and novices joined developers, designers, and NASA engineers to play with the latest gadgets and build creative mobile apps.

Hack Reactor is a developer bootcamp where people become software engineers through live coding, real-world projects, and meetups. On March 28, Leap Motion’s senior developer Dave Edelhart and I were invited to present the Leap Motion Controller and Three.js. Together with over 30 developers (both in training and from the wider San Francisco coding community), […]

Want to build the next great 3D app? Get a running start with our brand-new Boilerplate asset for Unity – featured today on Developer Labs. Plus, a new WebGL demo that lets you control five different music-driven visuals. Also new this week, three.js projects, shark-punching with Oculus Rift, touchless typing, mathematical art, and basketball dribbling like […]

PennApps is a meeting place for dedicated hackers ready to camp out for 48 hours straight of experimentation, coding, and a lot of energy drinks. We saw an impressive array of Leap Motion hacks built throughout the weekend, and when it came down to choosing the winner of the Leap Motion API prize, it was almost impossible to decide.

I’m Isaac, and I’m an experience engineer at Leap Motion. I work exploring a newly discovered relationship with our hands. I’m intensely interested in communing with digital nature, and the tools that I use are Three.js, Web Audio API, and most of all, Leap Motion. Most of what I have done can be found at cabbibo.com where I have been working on constructing my own personal Ice Kingdom.