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For hardware hackers, boards like Arduino and Raspberry Pi are the essential building blocks that let them mix and mash things together. But while these devices don’t have the processing power to run our core tracking software, there are many ways to bridge hand tracking input on your computer with the Internet of Things.

In this post, we’ll look at a couple of platforms that can get you started right away, along with some other open source examples. This is by no means an exhaustive list – Arduino’s website features hundreds of connective possibilities, from different communication protocols to software integrations. Whether you connect your board directly to your computer, or send signals over wifi, there’s always a way to hack it.

The global epidemic of boring presentations stops here. With Reveal.js, you have access to a powerful presentation platform that runs in your browser, giving you the ability to hack and connect it to almost anything. Want to point and navigate with Leap Motion instead of hunching over your laptop? You can do that. Let your audience cast votes on their cell phones? Absolutely.

Reveal.js is the brainchild of Hakim El-Attab, a Swedish engineer and co-founder of Slides. “Being able to add any HTML content inside of a presentation means you can have content that updates in real time, embed iframes like Tweets and YouTube videos and much more,” he says. “The framework is also easily hackable so that it can be tweaked to anyone’s personal preference.”

Following my tutorial on controlling the Sphero using the Leap Motion, I thought I would keep on converting my Node.js projects to Cylon.js and work on controlling an AR.Drone with Leap Motion.

One of the most powerful things about the Leap Motion platform is its ability to tie into just about any creative platform. That’s why we created a Platform Integrations & Libraries showcase where you can discover the latest wrappers, plugins, and integrations.

Cylon.js is a JavaScript framework for robotics, physical computing, and the Internet of Things (IoT) that makes it easy to network 36 different platforms (and counting). On our Developer Gallery, you can find example projects to help you get started with wirelessly controlled Arduino boards and Parrot AR.Drones. Recently, we got in touch with Ron Evans, the creator of Cylon.js and other open source robotics frameworks, about the emerging IoT revolution.

In my personal time, I love to play around with hardware and robots. I started in Node.js but recently I discovered Cylon.js and after a quick play around with it, I found it pretty awesome and decided to rewrite my projects using this framework.

As a starting point, I decided to rewrite the project to control the Sphero with the Leap Motion Controller.

It’s been five months since we launched the VR tracking beta, and since then we’ve made massive strides. In 2015, we’re building on this momentum with new resources for developers, while advancing support for several key VR platforms. In this post, I’d like to reflect on the year that we just left behind, and what’s coming in 2015. Here are just a few snapshots of the year ahead.

We learned so much on the ground with our developer community in 2014. Translating soothing gestures into meditative brainwaves on EEGs. Springing drones to life. Navigating new ways of thinking about user interfaces in VR.

You’ve built incredible things this year, and along the way, we’ve based many of the experiments, resources, and examples found in the Developer Portal on your feedback and feature requests. We can’t wait to keep that conversation going in the New Year. And now, for a bit of inspiration, behold – our 2014 Shortlist of Virtual Superlatives:

Who said Unity developers have all the fun? From building virtual hands in Three.js to browser-based virtual reality, we’re also developing new tools to enable truly 3D interaction on the web. This week, we’re happy to announce LeapJS Widgets – basic UI elements can be used in a wide variety of experiences. It’s a brand new library, simple enough to be used with just a few lines of code, but with near-infinite possibilities for experimentation and customization.

Want to build a compelling 3D interactive experience that anyone can instantly access through their browser? You’ve come to the right place! We just released a new VR demo that makes it really easy to start building right away. Built with Mozilla’s WebVR API, VR Quickstart features position and orientation tracking, Leap Motion interaction, and code that’s been broken down to bite-sized pieces.

Mathematics lies beneath the surface of just about everything – and VR is definitely no exception. If you’re not using our Unity VR assets, we know you’d much rather get started quickly than spend hours tweaking variables and teasing out rotation matrices. That’s why I put together this quick guide to VR essentials. In this post, we’ll cover correcting for distortion, orienting objects and cameras within your scene, and using the Image API for raw image passthrough.